expand/collapse risk warning

Trading financial products on margin carries a high risk and is not suitable for all investors. Ensure you fully understand the risks and take appropriate care to manage your risk.

Trading financial products on margin carries a high degree of risk and is not suitable for all investors. Please ensure you fully understand the risks and take appropriate care to manage your risk.

Your capital is at risk.

Trading Terms

What is inflation & examples?

What is inflation: 3D model of bar chart illustrating inflation data.

Nobody likes it when the prices of everyday things we use and rely on keep going up. This is what we call inflation. This increase in prices is called inflation. It happens because of different reasons, as you'll learn below.

What is inflation and what causes it?

Inflation is when prices go up over time. It means you might have to pay more money for the same things you buy. There are a few reasons why this happens:

  1. Demand is high: When a lot of people want to buy something, like the latest video game console, stores can charge more because they know people will still buy it.
  2. Costs increase: Sometimes, it costs more for companies to make things. For example, if oil prices rise, it costs more to transport goods, and companies might raise prices to cover these extra costs.
  3. Too much money: If there's a lot of money circulating in the economy, people have more to spend. When there's more money around, businesses might raise prices because they know people can afford to pay more.

Types of inflation

Different types of inflation happen for various reasons:

  1. Demand-pull inflation: This type occurs when there's a lot of demand for goods and services, but the supply can't keep up. When demand is high and supply is limited, prices tend to go up because businesses can charge more when there are more buyers than there are products available.
  2. Cost-push inflation: This happens when the cost of making goods and services goes up. For example, if the cost of raw materials or wages increases, businesses might raise prices to maintain their profit margins. So, when the costs of production rise, prices tend to rise too.
  3. Built-in inflation: This type is tied to people's expectations. When employees expect prices to rise, they might ask for higher wages to keep up with the cost of living. When businesses pay higher wages, they often raise prices to cover those costs. This can create a cycle where prices and wages keep going up together.

Historical Perspective on Inflation

Throughout history, inflation has been a recurring economic phenomenon. It reflects the general increase in prices of goods and services over time. Understanding its historical perspective helps us grasp how economies have coped with inflationary periods.

Notable periods of high inflation in history:

Several notable periods have witnessed significant inflationary pressures:

  1. 1970s oil crisis: Oil prices surged dramatically, leading to widespread inflation across many economies. Source: Investopedia
  2. Zimbabwe hyperinflation (2000s): Zimbabwe experienced extreme hyperinflation, with prices doubling every few hours at its peak. Source: Investopedia
No commissions, no markups.
22/07 - 26/07
AMZN.US: 00:00 - 20:00 UTC
SANDUSD: 00:00 - 20:00 UTC
Trade now

Trading strategies during inflation

Trading strategies during inflation focus on protecting your investments and potentially benefiting from rising prices. Here are some simple strategies:

  1. Invest in real assets: Real assets like real estate, commodities (like gold - XAUUSD and silver - XAGUSD, and infrastructure tend to hold or increase in value during inflation.
  2. Stocks of essential goods: Companies that sell essential goods (like food, utilities, and healthcare) could raise prices in line with inflation, making their stocks potentially valuable.
  3. Inflation-protected securities: Bonds and other securities designed to keep up with inflation could help protect your money's value.
  4. Diversify your portfolio: Spread your investments across different assets to reduce risk. This could include a mix of stocks, bonds and real estate.
  5. Stay informed: Keep an eye on economic indicators and news to adjust your strategy as needed.

Risk Disclaimer: Remember, all investments carry risks, and there's no guarantee of profits. It's essential to do your research or consult with a financial advisor before making investment decisions.

Capitalise on volatility in share markets
Take a position on moving share prices. Never miss an opportunity.
Sign up

Summary

While inflation can be challenging for consumers and businesses alike, understanding its causes and effects allows us to navigate its impacts more effectively. By employing sound financial strategies and staying informed, individuals could mitigate risks and even find opportunities amidst changing economic landscapes. Ultimately, managing inflation requires vigilance, adaptation, and prudent financial planning to safeguard one's financial well-being in dynamic economic environments.

FAQs

1. What is inflation in simple terms? 

Inflation is the increase in prices of goods and services over time, which means you need more money to buy the same things.

2. What causes inflation? 

Inflation can be caused by factors such as increased demand for goods and services, rising production costs, or an increase in the money supply.

3. How does inflation affect me? 

Inflation affects your purchasing power, meaning your money buys less over time. It can impact savings, investments, and everyday expenses.

5. Is inflation always bad? 

Moderate inflation (around 2-3% annually) is considered normal and could indicate a healthy economy. High or hyperinflation, however, can be detrimental, causing economic instability.

6. How is inflation measured? 

Inflation is measured using indexes like the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which tracks the average change in prices over time for a basket of goods and services.

7. How can individuals protect themselves from inflation? 

Strategies include investing in assets that typically rise with inflation (like real estate or commodities), diversifying investments, and considering inflation-protected securities.

What better way to welcome you than with a bonus?
Start trading with a $30 bonus on your first deposit.

Terms and Conditions apply
Get Bonus

8. Can inflation be controlled? 

Central banks and governments use monetary and fiscal policies to control inflation rates. Adjusting interest rates, managing money supply, and fiscal reforms are common tools.

9. What historical events are associated with high inflation? 

Examples include the 1970s oil crisis, Weimar Germany's hyperinflation in the 1920s, and more recent hyperinflation in Zimbabwe during the 2000s.

10. How does inflation impact businesses? 

Businesses may face increased costs for materials and labor, which could lead to higher prices for consumers. They also need to manage cash flow and adjust pricing strategies accordingly.

Past performance does not guarantee or predict future performance. This article is offered for general information and does not constitute investment advice. Please be informed that currently, Skilling is only offering CFDs.

No commissions, no markups.
22/07 - 26/07
AMZN.US: 00:00 - 20:00 UTC
SANDUSD: 00:00 - 20:00 UTC
Trade now
What better way to welcome you than with a bonus?
Start trading with a $30 bonus on your first deposit.

Terms and Conditions apply
Get Bonus
Capitalise on volatility in share markets
Take a position on moving share prices. Never miss an opportunity.
Sign up