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CFDs come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 71% of accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should understand how CFDs work and consider if you can take the risk of losing your money.

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 79% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

79% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.

Trading Terms

Short call: meaning in options trading

Short call: A computer room with two monitors and keyboards.

If you've been curious about options trading, you've likely encountered terms like "short call." But what exactly does it mean? Think of it as renting out your stock. Let's dive in.

What Is a short call and how does it work?

A short call is an options trading strategy where an investor sells a call option on a stock they don't currently own. Here's how it works:

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Imagine you believe a stock's price will decrease or stay the same. Instead of buying the stock, you sell a call option, giving someone else the right to buy the stock from you at a predetermined price (strike price) on or before a specific date (expiration date).

If the stock's price stays below the strike price until the expiration date, the call option expires worthless, and you keep the premium you received for selling the option. However, if the stock's price rises above the strike price, the call option holder may exercise their right to buy the stock from you at the strike price, regardless of the current market price. In this case, you'll need to sell the stock at the strike price, potentially resulting in a loss if the stock price is higher than the strike price.

In summary, a short call strategy profits when the stock's price remains below the strike price, but it could lead to losses if the stock's price exceeds the strike price. Therefore there’s risk involved and it might not be used by all investors. It's a strategy used by traders who anticipate neutral or bearish market conditions.

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What is a short call example?

Let's say shares of Apple are trading near $200 and are in a strong uptrend You think the stock won't go much higher. So, instead of buying Apple stock, you sell a call option with a strike price of $210 and an expiration date in one month. You receive a premium (payment) for selling this option.

Now, there are two scenarios:

If Apple's stock price stays below $210 until the option expires, the option buyer won't exercise their right to buy the stock from you. In this case, you keep the premium as profit.

However, if Apple's stock price rises above $210, the option buyer may choose to buy the stock from you at $210, even if the market price is higher. You'll have to sell the stock at a lower price, resulting in a loss.

In short, by selling the call option, you're betting that Apple's stock won't rise above $210 by the expiration date, allowing you to keep the premium as profit.

Short calls vs. long puts: Difference

Short calls and long puts are both options trading strategies that profit from a stock's price decrease, but they work differently. As we've seen, a short call involves selling a call option, betting the stock price won't rise above the strike price. In contrast, a long put involves buying a put option, betting the stock price will fall below the strike price. While short calls have limited profit potential and unlimited risk, long puts have limited risk and potentially unlimited profit. Essentially, short calls profit from stagnant or bearish market conditions, while long puts provide protection or profit from a stock's decline.

Summary

As we've seen, short calls are used in neutral or bearish market conditions. It's crucial to understand the risks involved, including potential unlimited losses if the stock price rises sharply. Always consult a financial advisor and thoroughly research before engaging in options trading.

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FAQs

1. What is a short call option?

A short call option is an options trading strategy where an investor sells a call option on a stock they don't own, betting that the stock's price will not rise above the strike price before the option expires.

2. How does a short call work?

In a short call, the seller receives a premium from the buyer in exchange for the right to buy the stock at a predetermined price (strike price) within a specified period (expiration date). If the stock's price remains below the strike price, the option expires worthless, and the seller keeps the premium. However, if the stock's price exceeds the strike price, the seller may face losses.

3. What is the risk of a short call?

No, options trading involves significant risks and may not be suitable for all investors. It requires a thorough understanding of options contracts, market dynamics, and risk management strategies. Investors should consider their risk tolerance, investment objectives, and financial situation before engaging in options trading. Consulting a financial advisor is advisable.

This article is offered for general information and does not constitute investment advice. Please be informed that currently, Skilling is only offering CFDs.

No commissions, no markups.
15/07 - 19/07
TSLA.US: 00:00 - 21:00 UTC
MANAUSD: 13:30 - 20:00 UTC
Trade now
Capitalise on volatility in share markets
Take a position on moving share prices. Never miss an opportunity.
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